Dreaming Big Dreams for Girls’ Education

Video by Faolan Jones

“I will do whatever it takes to help her achieve her dreams. My dreams were broken, but I will never break my children’s dreams.”

— Mother of a Teach For India student

 

It has been nearly three years since then-15-year-old Pakastani student activist Malala Yousafzai was shot by extremists for advocating that girls have a right to a quality education. Since that time, Malala’s tragedy and her remarkable recovery have helped raise awareness of the millions of girls and women around the world who have been denied an education simply because of their gender.

Across the network, Teach For All partner staff, teachers, and alumni are working together with families and communities to ensure that all of their students, including girls, are receiving the education they need to lead lives of choice and opportunity. Often, this means forming close, trusting relationships with parents to build an understanding of the possibilities that will open up for their daughters if they’re allowed to remain in school. In many cases, these parents—who often were denied an education themselves—become their daughters’ biggest champions and fiercest advocates.

In the video above, Teach For India Fellow Pooja Chopra explains how in getting to know her students’ mothers, she learned that they had big dreams for their daughters, but felt powerless to do anything about it. By developing a learning community based on close, trusting relationships with these mothers, Pooja helped them gain the skills and confidence to support and advocate for their daughters’ education—and their own.

Learn more about Pooja Chopra and the collaborative vision she developed with her students.

Read highlights from our Girls’ Education Twitter Chat and the Teach For All Forum on Girls’ Education, and learn about girls’ education initiatives at Teach For Nepal and Teach For Pakistan,

Learn more about Malala Day and read Teach For All CEO Wendy Kopp's reflections on how Malala made education a top priority on the global agenda.